Refugee Rap: From Syria to North Korea

by birtanpublished on July 2, 2020

I don't know if you've looked outside

lately the world is having a time but if

there's one thing that always emerges

from adversity more than hope or promise

for the future it's always hip-hop if

you've been hanging around here for a

minute you may have noticed that there

are two things that I'd love to talk

about one very specific metal subgenres

like burglar metal or porno ground and

the other is regional hip hop whether

it's emerging from ISIL or more benign

Lee England chap hop is a term invented

by the man born Jim Burke to describe

his game defied rapping about cricket

I'm sorry more than any other genre

what makes hip-hop so potent is the

almost non-existent barrier to entry it

helps if you're related to lucious Lyon

but really all you need is your own

voice and something to say about your

own experience a lot of deaf people are

into hip-hop it makes sense there's

heavy bass there's words that can be

signed and so it only makes sense that

there are now rappers numerous rappers

who can't hear much of anything there is

a humanitarian crisis of monster

proportions knocking on our door as

millions are forced to flee Iraq and

Syria and given everything that we know

about hip-hop it makes sense that

someone in that diaspora would be

rapping about Syrian dream are a group

of dudes with literally just a flute as

far as I can tell living in Egypt

originally from Damascus they fled Syria

three years ago and what is so touching

about watching them in interviews is how

in the same breath they will express a

desire to tour the world professionally

and also to return home to Syria for all

Syrians to have an opportunity to return

another Syrian refugee rapper has found

his way into Western Facebook feeds

lately the slightly more polished murder

eyes recently profiled by Vice magazine

and originally the name for an entire

crew murder eyes wears the crown of

Syria's first rapper showing up on the

scene in early 90s he owned his own

studio his own record labels own

clothing store all of which he was

forced to abandon when he fled the

Syrian civil war in 2012

he now lives in Germany along with a

steadily growing number of Syrian

refugees and has dedicated himself to

his own Syrian hip-hop unity movement

it's an important ideal and one with

some precedence in the world of refugee

rap we are casue is a Somali collective

formed in Kenya a group of refugees

spanning religious and ethnic regions

the degree to become one of the most

popular hip-hop acts in East Africa we

are casue whose music often speaks out

against Islamic extremism were forced to

uproot themselves again in 2014 when the

refugee status in Kenya was revoked and

they're currently seeking asylum in the

Netherlands so as much as the news cycle

is currently focused on refugee stories

from that kind of part of the world

there is just as interesting and vital

refugee wrap coming from the opposite

side of the planet would you believe

that that guy used to live under the

thumb of an oppressive communist regime

in those furs

I'm busted a bunch of light Kang Joong

Hyuk defected from North Korea as a

teenager and today he uses his platform

as an artist to speak out against the

government that he was forced to flee he

puppet on an island

I will go to Peggy Ohana boat everything

other too much how you located the

victim then to my tone to Wingo about

that anything my point exactly

or the point I was trying to make at the

beginning of this video

hip hop is the dominant sound of

American popular culture and therefore

it has an audience of young people all

over the world but in addition to that

it is accessible and it doesn't have to

be subtle so if you have something

important to say hip hop is the perfect

way to find an audience and to say it

and if someone has something to say

about something as unique and vital and

important as fleeing violence in their

homeland

we should probably listen what do you

think is hip-hop a unique form of

expression in the way that we're talking

about it right now

we actually have I think a perfect

sponsor for this episode and it's a new

app called we mesh we can't always be in

the same place as our friends and family

I have close friends I only see once a

year because they live somewhere dumb

like Houston or the suburbs and what we

mesh does is lets you watch youtube

videos in perfect sync with those people

while chatting and talking over voice

over IP the sync is so precise that you

could literally do karaoke with your

friends in Dubai in Vancouver and I love

what apps like this are doing to shrink

the world and let us share more

experiences with the people that we

don't get to see all the time so you and

your friends could have a session where

you just watch all of the diss exist

episodes and talk about how good and

smart I am there's a link in the

description to check out we mesh for

Android and iOS so go check it out and

let me know what you think subscribe for

new episodes of this exists every week

and be excellent to each other

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