How to use blend modes in Imerge Pro

by birtanpublished on September 2, 2020

Hey, this is Axel from FXhome, here with a tutorial on using Blend Modes for grading. We will be looking primarily at Imerge Pro in this tutorial, but the techniques we discuss will work just as well with video files in HitFilm Express or HitFilm Pro. So no matter what software you are using, these techniques should prove useful. Here we are in Imerge, and we will look at a bunch of changes we can make using nothing but adjustment layers and blend modes. In Imerge, create a new Adjustment Layer. Change the blend mode to Soft Light, and instantly the contrast of the image is boosted, and

The colors get a bit more saturation. If you are using HitFilm, create a Grade layer. Adjustment layers in Imerge and Grade Layers in HitFilm serve the same purpose; they allow you to apply effects to all the layers beneath them. They way they do this is by rendering all the lower layers into a new image, which is then used to calculate the results of any changes made using the Adjustment or grade layer. So, when we add an adjustment layer and change its blend mode, the result is the same as

If we duplicated the image or video layer, and changed the blend mode of the copy, but with half as much decoding required by your computer, and a lot more versatility. If you want even more contrast than Soft Light brings, then Overlay or Hard Light work well. And if you want less contrast, you can reduce the Opacity of the grade layer. You can also use this technique to brighten or darken images. If your source image or video is too dark, try using Screen to brighten it, or Add for even brighter results. Add

Can blow the highlights out if there are bright areas in the layer, so be careful of that. And to darken layers that are too bright Multiply works well. Multiply can’t restore detail to blown out highlights, though, so it works best for darkening decently exposed files, perhaps to help in creating a day for night look. A few other benefits of this technique: If you have an image which is composited using multiple layers, you don’t need to duplicate all of those layers, a single grade layer

Serves the same purpose, and keeps things simple and fast. Also, you can swap out the underlying layers or images, and get the same results. In Imerge, this is important for batch processing multiple images. If you have multiple content variations in a lower layer, you don’t have to duplicate those images and update every copy for each image. You can use an adjustment layer above, and then each variation you choose is processed correctly. Blend modes are one area of editing that frequently benefits from experimentation, so try adding

An Adjustment Layer in Imerge, or a grade layer in HitFilm, and changing the blend mode to find a result that you like. In Imerge they are divided into groups, based on their behavior. For the top three groups, the first mode listed indicates the group’s general behavior. These are normal, all the options in this group darken your image, this group lightens it. The next group alters contrast, and the last group provides HSL adjustments; Hue, Saturation, and Luminosity. The remaining group includes all the other stray modes that

Don’t fit into the other categories. Remembering this can be helpful when experimenting with the blend modes, so you aren’t flying completely blind. You can also add effects into this technique, to further control the results. If we select screen blend mode, and add a blur to the adjustment layer, we get a diffusion effect. Blurs can also soften the results of other blend modes. You can use Levels or Curves to block the results from affecting the brightest or darkest areas of the image. Or, add a Black And White

Effect to the adjustment layer, to create a high contrast image with muted colors. The HSL blend modes are also useful for applying effects. (LaPush) You can use effects to make adjustments, then apply those adjustments to specific channels, such as the Luminosity, the Hue, or the Saturation. For example, if we remove these effects and create a gradient on the adjustment layer, then blend it using Color, we retain all the luminosity of the underlying layer, and just apply the color data of the gradient to it.

These are just a few of the numerous possibilities offered by blend modes. They're versatile and easy to experiment with, so I encourage you to try them out. Thanks very much for watching, and you can learn more about Imerge Pro here. Remember to subscribe if you want to catch all our new content for Imerge and HitFilm.

Related Videos

You you hey guys welcome back to the first livestream of 2019 hopefully we're live I think the twenty second delay is just it's weird to get used to but...
In today’s tutorial we’re going to be looking at the 360 workflow and a couple of features HitFilm has to offer. The link in the description will provide a 50% ...
In this video we're going to take a look at the new features that were added in version 2 of Imerge Pro. You can learn more from the blog post on our websit...
Today we're taking a look at the upcoming features in the version 12 update for HitFilm Pro and Express the update will be coming out later this month but w...
Green screen is used in all types of movies, to put actors in places that would otherwise be expensive or impossible. Maybe you’ve filmed your subject against a...
So you’ve filmed your subject against a green screen, and you’ve successfully brought it into HitFilm and keyed out the green. But you’re not done yet- the comp...
Hi, I’m Axel from FXhome, and this video series is going to answer the question, “How do I use masks in Imerge Pro?” This video will examine how we can use Grad...
Hi, I’m Axel from FXhome, and this is the second part of our series on Masking in Imerge Pro. So if you haven’t watched the first video yet, I encourage you to ...
Hey guys, welcome back to another HitFilm tutorial. Alita Battle Angel recently launched and in this film they took CG and mo-cap to a completely new level to r...
Lighting your shots correctly is one of the most basic, but often overlooked, things you can do to make your videos look better. It doesn’t matter what type of ...
That clip comes from our new short classified mission renegade over the next few weeks we'll have tutorials for the effects you see in renegade and today we...
In this tutorial we’ll be covering how to create the bullet hits effect from our latest short, Renegade. This scene used stock footage from ActionVFX, who have ...
A good title sequence can help set the mood for your film. Today we'll be taking a look at how we creatd the title for our short film, Renegade, using stock...
When we made our latest short, Renegade, we knew we wanted to include a Mission: Impossible-style timer. In this tutorial we’ll take a look at how to create one...
Hey guys, welcome back to another video. Today we're going to be covering the behind the scenes stuff of Renegade; how we did it, what happened and what we ...
Hey guys, today we're going to be looking at the VFX Supervisor and how you can prepare for visual effects. When producing visual effects it’s never as simp...
Hey, this is Axel from FXhome, here with a tutorial on using Blend Modes for grading. We will be looking primarily at Imerge Pro in this tutorial, but the techn...
In today’s tutorial, we’re going to be looking at satellite surveillance and image stitching. In the example sequence, I use footage from a DJI Spark for my end...
A shaky camera can be a good thing or a bad thing, depending on the type of film you’re trying to make. It can increase the feeling of danger and put you right ...
Today we're going to be talking about camera psychology. They say a picture is worth a thousand words, and in the realm of film production that couldn’t be ...