How to use basic editing techniques to enhance your films

by birtanpublished on August 25, 2020

Hi guys, Tom here from FXhome, and today we're going to be looking at editing techniques and approaches that you can use within HitFilm. Editing is very similar to Visual Effects in that when done right & effectively, no one should notice that you've done anything. Complicated, I know. They’re invisible aids to help build your scene & captivate your audience. Though a simple cut can be effective, let's go over a couple techniques to enhance your editing in HitFilm. Every shot is designed to provide information. While editing controls the pace at which the

Information is provided. This leads into the two ideologies of editing methods – Mechanical & Narrative. These two are just terms used in analysing an edit, Mechanical- how are the shots assembled. While Narrative is, of course, is how it shapes the story. What it boils down to is the intent of the content. Before starting any edit, look at the footage you have, and analyze it for key information or emotional weight and they're the points that you start with. Those are the moments

That you want to hit, but the time that you take in leading up to those drastically changes the emotional takeaway. There's a huge variety of techniques to use while in the editing suite. Each of which to provide an alternative flow and pace to a scene. No doubt you will recognize some of these from films, but we have. The Straight Cut, this is your super easy ‘one clip ends, another begins’. The Split Cut, otherwise known as the L or

J cut because of the shape they make on the timeline. L and J. These act as a mini transition between shots and scenes, that you’ll often see within Documentaries or non-linear narratives, the audio and visual overlap is great for demonstrating kind of that realistic conversation feel, or alternatively easing someone into the next scene. Jump Cuts, your favourite YouTuber is likely to use these. Me included. Here we have multiple shots within the same setup. Yet have slight differences but not enough to make it a different

Take. Plus, it makes you look fidgety. The Match Cut heavily relies on action. Having the camera at one angle, then cutting to another to finish the motion. This, of course, is to give the impression the motion is continuous. But, don't go too crazy with it. Now, for my personal favourite, The Graphic Match Cut, here’s when you use visual shapes, audio or imagery to create this rapid cut between two scenes that are completely different. But visually appealing. They’re commonly

Used for comedy, action or again, easing into another location. Edgar Wright is probably the king of these. It’s worth noting that as humans we are continuously scanning for information. Though it may not be possible depending on the shots that are obtained, it is highly recommended that the action & movement is kept within as close proximity as one another. This keeps the audience fixed onto the screen as their vision is comfortably placed. One of the best

Examples is Mad Max Fury Road, where Director George Miller had used a target system to keep all his action center frame. As an alternative, sometimes it's best not to cut at all. Holding on a shot for a long period of time causes that scanning motion to begin. Actively allowing the audience to become the editor, choosing what grabs their attention and providing alternative takeaways. Commonly see these done effectively in old musicals or the master

Of the one-shot, Steven Spielberg. Each uses a combination of camera and actor motions to hide the take and keep the audience from getting impatient and craving a cut. And cut. I really hope that this has been helpful for your editing techniques. For more insight into structuring your film, check out our video on visual storytelling. Link down in the description. Till next time, leave any questions down below, don't forget to subscribe, and ring the bell for notifications of when we next upload.

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