How to Film a Sports Commercial

published on July 20, 2020

Hello welcome to four minute film school I'm Vee from the a-team and today we are doing a sportswear ad something you would see like on a Nike or adidas commercial it's dark it's gritty and it's in black and white let's go alright I'm here with oliver Lukacs he is a

Cinematographer here in Los Angeles he does music videos Western horror films and today we are making a commercial what is the vibe we're going for sort of like a Nike or adidas commercial sportswear apparel but drama so this

Entire scene is in black and white how come you chose to make it that way I wanted to be very dramatic it's limiting in a way that's creatively challenging so the first shot you lit for is this wide going into medium it's on a dolly

And I see this big kind of strip of light along the bottom what was that I was light leaking in from the bottom of an elephant door that we closed almost all the way provides you with separation from the background and it gives you a

Depth cue so you get a sense of parallax when you're pushing in and then your brightest light your main light was actually more of a rim yeah it was it was a hard edge backlight I was a 300d mark too with the Fornell a lot of

Higher on it and then we had a book light as the key light how did you achieve that book light book light was another 300 be my cue with fern Ellen's punching into an 8 by ultra balanced t-bone and I got pushed through an 8 by

Quarter grid so why do a book light for this type of diffusion instead of say bouncing it off a white card or double diffusing it look like horses alike to struggle more than if you do it directly in diffuse it the

More light struggles the more natural it feels so yeah the light is traveling almost further in that first it's bouncing then it's diffusing so I noticed in this shot you actually have no fill at all yeah I just have not to

Use fill so I think it's more dramatic some people will always want to have feel because they want to be safe to see the details and shadows and I think you don't always need to see every detail in the shadow speaking of seeing more

Detail you did do a little bit more of a close-up shot you punched in on his face and this was another dollar shot but this time not a straightforward dollar right yeah it was just a banana movement on a curved track and we look quite

Closer to his faces that there was more rap and the lights in his eyes were a little more prominent kept the backlight where it was and added a little bit of and as you're going around that track I notice another light sort of appears in

The background it's this vertical strip of light what was that oh yeah that was the entrance the front door to the gym we left it like a crack open so you have a depth cue and then you could feel the Carroll Act and now you also did another

Close-up but this time he went low on the shoes what did you change up for that we opened the elephant door in the background because we wanted to indicate passage of time we took the 300d that was the hard back edge and just put it

On the ground so it was on level with his feet and it was sort of scraping the floor at the same time what I also like about having the elephant door open was that you get that reflection in the floor as well

And of course why I have a sports ad if you don't have a gratuitous shot of a muscle-flexing right what was the lighting for that we use something we call a sandwich light which is a light from both sides and when was a hard

Light another one was a book light so that you had a hard edge on one side of the muscle and you had a nice soft roll off so you can see that the veins sort of popping up what are some tips for people for

Shooting in black and white if you're intending to deliver in black and white you should light for black and white so on set if you can have a monitoring LUT or the saturate and internally so that you know what your end image is going to

Look like all right let's take a look at this whole scene all right Oliver if we want to shoot something similar to this what are some things we should keep in mind using a combination of hard back light with a

Soft key light knowing what your final look is gonna be before you start shooting it lighting to that look onset and the third is using depth to use as much as possible depth cues like for example in that close-up shot of the

Face having that light in the background to help parallax and show off the depth of the space so as far as shooting black and white goes we want to know for your comment question what is a movie that was shot in color that would have worked

A lot better if it was done in black and white let us know and the best answer is going to win an empty skb case if you liked this episode if you like what we do then please give us a like literally like us on YouTube follow subscribe if

You want to follow either of us our social media links are gonna be down below that's it see you next time adios amigos

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